Supreme Court Blocks Biden Vaccine Mandate for Businesses

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Jan. 13, 2022 – The U.S. Supreme Court on Thursday struck down President Joe Biden’s vaccine mandate for large businesses but said a similar one may continue while challenges to the rules move through lower courts.

The vote was 6-3 against the large business mandate and 5-4 in favor of the health care worker mandate.

Biden’s proposed vaccine mandate for businesses covered every company with more than 100 employees. It would require those businesses to make sure employees were either vaccinated or tested weekly for COVID-19.

In its ruling, the majority of the court called the plan a “blunt instrument.” The Occupational Safety and Health Administration was to enforce the rule, but the court ruled the mandate is outside the agency’s purview.

“OSHA has never before imposed such a mandate. Nor has Congress. Indeed, although Congress has enacted significant legislation addressing the COVID–19 pandemic, it has declined to enact any measure similar to what OSHA has promulgated here,” the majority wrote.

The court said the mandate is “no ‘everyday exercise of federal power.’ It is instead a significant encroachment into the lives — and health — of a  vast number of employees.”

While the Biden administration argued that COVID-19 is an “occupational hazard” and therefore under OSHA’s power to regulate, the court said it did not agree.

“Although COVID–19 is a risk that occurs in many workplaces, it is not an occupational hazard in most. COVID–19 can and does spread at home, in schools, during sporting events, and everywhere else that people gather,” the justices wrote.

That kind of universal risk, they said, “is no different from the day-to-day dangers that all face from crime, air pollution, or any number of communicable diseases.”

But in their dissent, justices Stephen Breyer, Sonia Sotomayor and Elena Kagan, said COVID-19 spreads “in confined indoor spaces, so causes harm in

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